Virtual Camp Middle School: Chestnut Grove

Due to COVID19 restrictions the in-person Camp Middle School program was suspended for 2020.

This year there was a virtual program to replace the face-to-face event to help support the transition from elementary school to middle school for Stokes County Schools 6th graders.

On August 6th Insight Human Services hosted a webinar for rising 6th graders and their parents. Below is the content that was shown during the webinar to help prepare 6th graders for the upcoming school year.

If you have any questions about the content below please contact Chestnut Grove Middle at 336-983-2106

You can contact Mr. Bennett, Principal, at david.bennett@stokes.k12.nc.us

You can contact Ms. Lessane, Assistant Principal, with free/reduced lunch questions at eyanna.lessane@stokes.k12.nc

You can contact Mr. Richardson, Assistant Principal, with bus transportation questions at matthew.richardson@stokes.k12.nc.us



 

Virtual Camp Middle School: Southeastern

Due to COVID19 restrictions the in-person Camp Middle School program was suspended for 2020.

This year there was a virtual program to replace the face-to-face event to help support the transition from elementary school to middle school for Stokes County Schools 6th graders.

On August 5th Insight Human Services hosted a webinar for rising 6th graders and their parents. Below is the content that was shown during the webinar to help prepare 6th graders for the upcoming school year.

If you have any questions about the content below please contact Southeastern Middle at 336-591-4371.

You can reach out to Mrs. Jackson, Principal, at rhonda.jackson@stokes.k12.nc.us

You can reach out to Mr. Ross, Assistant Principal, with any bus transportation questions, at david.ross@stokes.k12.nc.us

Virtual Camp Middle School: Piney Grove

Due to COVID19 restrictions the in-person Camp Middle School program was suspended for 2020.

This year there was a virtual program to replace the face-to-face event to help support the transition from elementary school to middle school for Stokes County Schools 6th graders.

On August 4th Insight Human Services hosted a webinar for rising 6th graders and their parents. Below is the content that was shown during the webinar to help prepare 6th graders for the upcoming school year.

If you have any questions about the content below please contact Piney Grove Middle at 336-593-4000.

You can reach out via email to Mrs. Pendleton, Principal, at heather.pendleton@stokes.k12.nc.us.

You can reach out to Mrs. Mounce, Assistant Principal, about any bus questions at 336-593-4000.

You can reach out to Mrs. Williams, School Counselor, at anna.williams3@stokes.k12.nc.us.

Review of July 16th Virtual Lunch and Learn: “This Place” Film

Underage Alcohol Use on the Rise Due to COVID19

There is data showing that off-premises retailers in North Carolina are selling record numbers of beer, wine and liquor. How does that translate to youth alcohol use?

Youth are home now more than ever and may be unsupervised.
Adult use rates of alcohol have been increasing state-wide.
The possibility of an increase in youth alcohol use is something that should be considered.
Data from the 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Survey in regards to alcohol use by youth. This is the last Youth Risk Behavior Survey data collection available and can be found here https://nccd.cdc.gov/youthonline/App/Results.aspx?LID=NC.

Did You Know: Before COVID19…

  • The #1 place youth got alcohol is from their own home.
  • Over 1,800 college students died from alcohol related injuries each year.
  • In the US alcohol kills more than all illegal drugs combined.
  • Teen girls rival teen boys with consumption rates of alcohol.
  • Every day 7,000 kids younger than 16 years old consume their first alcoholic drink.
  • Kids under 15 years old who consume alcohol are four times likely to end up alcohol dependant as an adult than if they waited until they were 21 years old for their first drink.

How can this be changed?

Parents and guardians can make a positive impact in their communities by doing a few things.
  • Monitor and secure alcohol in the home.
    • Purchasing in quantity is more cost effective but it is harder to keep up with 24 beers or a case of wine than it is a 6 pack or bottle.
    • Only purchase what you will consume.
    • Even if it costs a couple dollars more this tactic regarding alcohol storage will make less alcohol available for youth resulting in fewer youth consuming.
    • Storing alcohol in cabinet or unmonitored areas of the home allows youth access.
    • Keeping alcohol stored appropriately, like firearms and dangerous household chemicals, will keep youth from consuming alcohol.
  • How youth see alcohol consumed in their environment determines their perception of alcohol.
    • During events at the home (birthday parties, cookouts, holiday celebrations) make sure alcohol is not the focal point of the event.
    • Don’t glamorize alcohol use.
    • Show youth that a good time can be had without alcohol.
  • Parents rationalizing youth use.
    • Parent provided parties are not the answer.
    • Parent provided parties are dangerous.
    • Parent provided parties normalize alcohol use by youth.
Follow these guidelines to help reduce underage alcohol use in our communities.

On July 16th we hosted a virtual lunch and learn where the film “This Place” was shown.

Following the film was a discussion about underage alcohol use and how it impacts communities in Stokes County.

“This Place” is an award-winning, 15-minute film that dramatically captures today’s youth drinking culture. This film shows the alcohol-saturated environment kids are exposed to and the impact of underage drinking. It also offers an important glimpse into communities that are taking action to reduce alcohol problems.

If you are a parent/guardian, caregiver to youth, coach, teacher, community member, faith leader or are interested in creating positive change in your community this film will allow you to be better informed about underage alcohol use and introduce concepts to help decrease alcohol misuse in your community.

A local parent of three students who are in the Stokes County School System viewed the film and had this commentary to provide.
A local provider specializing in substance use disorder and mental health had this commentary after viewing the film.

These national statistics provided by the Monitoring the Future Survey show the bigger picture of underage alcohol use. This may be a snapshot of the nationwide average but this is an issue that impacts Stokes County communities.

Monitoring the Future Survey from 2019 highlights the youth alcohol use rates for lifetime consumption.
Monitoring the Future Survey from 2019 highlights the youth alcohol use rates for past year consumption
Monitoring the Future Survey from 2019 highlights the youth alcohol use rates for past month consumption.
If you would like more information please reach out to us.

For more information on how you can make a positive impact in your community, reduce underage alcohol use or reduce adult alcohol misuse reach out to us. dvickers@insightnc.org or 336-287-2411

Operation Parent Webinar: Shedding Light on Youth Alcohol Usage and Binge Drinking

Underage alcohol use can have many short-term and long-term impacts that youth may not realize. Listen to Mary Beth Uberti explain the dangers of alcohol use among teens and how parents can intervene to help keep their children healthy and safe.

 

More information about Operation Parent and their free resources for parents and guardians can be found at https://operationparent.org/resource-manager/

Operation Parent Webinar: Cyberbullying

As the daughter of a disabled Vietnam veteran, Heather French Henry has experienced the pain and suffering that can come with military service. Throughout her life she followed her father into the halls of VA hospitals for treatments, experienced his night terrors and stood by his side in his miraculous journey “home” from the terrors of war.

After winning the title of Miss America 2000 she traveled over 300,000 miles across the United States on a national speaking tour entitled “Our Forgotten Heroes: Honoring Our Nations Homeless Veterans.” Throughout her year she not only visited veterans facilities meeting and talking with veterans but her platform often took her to our nation’s capital to lobby members of Congress and Senate on veterans issues and legislation.

During her tour veteran’s healthcare issues became another serious focus and a second campaign began entitled “Fighting the Silent Enemy: Hepatitis C.” Touring the country with Hepatitis C advocates screenings were held and hundreds of veterans were screened and made aware of the dangers of Hepatitis C.

In Heather’s own words: “I will always be the daughter of a veteran and therefore I will always honor those who fell by continuing to serve those who live.”

Operation Parent Webinar: Teens, E-cigarettes and Vaping

Dr. Patricia Purcell shares information and talking points about vaping and e-cigarette use by teens that parents and guardians can reference. She is clear and uses language that we can call understand. The webinar below is an hour long but well worth a listen for any parent, guardian, grandparent or caregiver of youth.

More information about Operation Parent and their free resources for parents and guardians can be found at https://operationparent.org/resource-manager/

Operation Parent Webinar: When Alcohol, Summer, COVID and Teens Intersect

Parents and guardians can click here to register for the FREE webinar from Operation Parent

This free webinar from Operation Parent will be held on Monday June 15th from 2:00pm-3:00pm.

Since Operation Parent’s webinar on alcohol in March, communities across the country have seen instore and online sales of alcohol skyrocket, and some parents relaxing abstinence rules at home to placate and bond with teens.

Additionally, easing of social distancing orders in many parts of the country are coinciding with the start of summer, which is already a time of risk for alcohol abuse and drinking and driving with teens. Cooped up teens might be looking forward to blowing off steam…in unhealthy ways.

Let’s discuss how we can be prepared to parent during these times of transition and uncertainty to keep our teens safe.

Presenters are Christine Storm and Kate Appleman of Caron Treatment Center. The Caron Treatment Center is an inpatient treatment facility with location in Florida and Pennsylvania. They have been providing innovative, specialized addiction & behavioral health treatment for over 60 years.

More information about Operation Parent and their free resources for parents and guardians can be found at https://operationparent.org/resource-manager/

Operation Parent: Who They Are, What Do They Do?

Operation Parent started when parents, who needed help and couldn’t find one central source for trustworthy, practical information on tough day-to-day parenting issues. From that, their organization was born.

 

A platform sourced with the “must know” material for anyone raising teens and preteens, curated from leading experts and our own experiences as parents.

The world our kids are growing up in is different than the one we grew up in. It changes constantly. We keep up with those changes and share the information parents need to know to keep their children healthy and safe. Parents that connect with us learn to:

Raise their awareness and confidence

Initiate meaningful conversations with their child(ren)

Set age appropriate boundaries

Recognize early warning signs

Prevent addiction, bullying, suicide, violence and more

What makes them unique?

It’s personal to them.

They are parents and they have encountered many of these issues on our parenting journey.  They’re passionate about family and want to do all they can to help parents stay connected to their children during the challenging teen and preteen years.

They provide ongoing prevention education.  

Prevention is a process…not a one-time event. Prevention happens when parents are educated and supported along their parenting journey. Operation Parent wants to walk alongside parents throughout their journey and find the best time to connect is in elementary school and stay connected through middle and high school.

 

Stokes: Stay Home. Stay Safe. Save Lives. Danbury Public Library

For our series of Local People, Local Stories, Local Impact, we spoke with Lisa Lawless, Branch Librarian for Danbury Public Library, about how COVID19 has impacted their services.

1007 N Main St Danbury, NC
(336) 593-2419

Can you describe the feeling of having to close Danbury Public Library due to COVID19 restrictions?

“As a professional librarian, I never thought I would see the day that libraries closed their doors. Surreal does not even begin to describe it. Libraries have endured many changes over the years but are such a vital part of our society that not being able to open for our patrons (due to coronavirus) feels like a sacrilege. We cannot wait to get back to some semblance of normal.

What did a normal day look like at Danbury Public Library before COVID19?

A normal day in Danbury includes the countless people that visit our local libraries every day to use the internet, find a job using NC Works, and borrow books from all across the state using NC Cardinal.

We are honored to share that Ancestry.com, which is usually only available for free use inside the library, is now available online by using our website nwrl.org.

There you will also find movies, audiobooks and e-books, kids books, newspapers, old high school yearbooks, and instructional videos to learn over 70 different languages, all FREE with your library card (which is also free). 

Mad Science is a group that performs using science experiments. It’s really popular in the schools. They will come out dressed like a crazy scientist and engage the kids on whatever experiment they are doing. Every show I’ve seen is different, but every single one has been amazing. They really do a great job. Their website is madscience.org if you need more details.

Although borrowing books may be on hold for a bit longer, our website is fully functional with a plethora of services, including the ones listed above. 

What is your favorite part of the Danbury Public Library?

My favorite part of Danbury Public Library is that we are also home to the Stokes County Bookmobile. Our driver, Jeannie Wall, goes all over Stokes County taking books to those who are homebound or elderly. Everyone is always so happy to see her!

There are not many things that will show up at your door for FREE just to make you happy, but it happens every day with the bookmobile. I cannot wait until we are able to get back out on the road and deliver books and magazines to those who truly appreciate it.

Every now and then, Jeannie will come back from that day’s route and have a pie that one of the patrons made for our staff, or a handmade Christmas ornament to put on our tree during the holidays. This is the kind of thing that sounds like the “good ol’ days” but is still part of ‘normal’ at Danbury Public Library.

What is something unique to the Danbury Public Library that residents should look into when COVID19 restrictions are lifted?

Danbury Public Library has many visitors to our Stokes County History Room where the largest chunk of county genealogical information is stored. We’ve had visitors come in to do research  from all across the United States as well as other countries like China and France. We also have some amazing displays of historical items that include a piece of flexible sandstone (called limber grit) that is only found in five places across the world, one of which is Stokes County. It’s a rock but it really does bend! We have a gas mask from World War I that was used and donated by a Stokes County resident, and we even have a collection of old Bibles that were found in various places across the county, including one that once belonged to a slave that lived nearby.

We miss each and every one of you and look forward to seeing you soon, and serving you in any way we can in the meantime. Everyone stay safe and well.

        -Lisa Lawless, Branch Librarian Danbury Public Library

You can contact the Danbury Public Library via phone at (336) 593-2419, email them at dnb@nwrl.org or get information from their Facebook page.


Read our other entries in Local People, Local Stories, Local Impact here.